• The writing is pretty serious, but I like it. It kind of reminds me of the writing in One Day in December.
  • “First glimpse” 9-19
  • Age gaps really turn me off. But I kind of adore Elisa and Pablo together. And I get the same kind of feeling with Marisol and Luis. At first, I was like, “don’t jump to conclusions, Kaeley. Just because they’re two people doesn’t mean they’ll end up together” but then I was also like “it’s a romance book” and also when he started playing that Saxophone, and clearly for her, well I’m sold.
  • Well, Luis is married, so I can’t very well ship them now.
  • I seriously thought Marisol would be getting her family’s jewelry. But her grandmother’s personal box is way more intimate.
  • THERE’S A RING IN THERE PABLO PROPOSED TO ELISA OMFG
  • Hmmm… the way Elisa is speaking it feels like there’s another sibling…
  • Ah her brother… Alejandro.
  • I think Pablo is pretty harsh on Elisa. He feels bad for Elisa and maybe even looks down on her a bit for not doing anything to step outside what her parents want for herself—but she has a point, how would she live if her parents disowned her? As a woman, she has a lot less options than Alejandro did.
  • I’m so sad for Elisa and Pablo. I love them so much.

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  • And there’s no way Pablo can be alive back in 2017. He was like 20 years older than Elisa, though Marisol doesn’t know that. I weep with tragedy.
  • I wonder if Luis is just not happy with his wife? Is that how people cheat? Because there’s something lacking in their current relationship?
  • I haven’t ever cared about Rum or Cuban cigars mostly because I don’t drink or smoke. But all people seem to know about Cuba is rum, cigars, and communism. This is also what I mean about poverty outside the United States. It’s on a different level.
  • Hallelujah Luis is NOT married. Now I can properly ship Marisol and him.
  • I think I knew Elisa had a baby bc I had flipped through the book and had seen the word. But it’s… a bit expected… like it just always a baby. And I understand because it raises the stakes but also—what are the chances of people getting pregnant the FIRST time? Idk.
  • I think I saw it coming, that Pablo was dead. But it still fills me with sadness. I just loved them so much together.
  • I was totally not expecting them to get taken by Castro’s men. I guess I was kind of in a bubble. Like I didn’t really expect this book to get that real.

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  • It has to be Pablo. Right? So this book comes full circle. It had to be Pablo and his men who took Marisol and Luis. It’s a cruel twist of fate, a shot in the dark that he survived only to realize Elisa already fled with her family.
  • HES LOOKING AT ELISA’S RING ON MARISOL’S FINGER ITS PABLO
  • 6/10—I really loved the first 3/4 of this book; it was like a 8/10. But I really didn’t enjoy the last quarter as much. It felt a bit rushed, and I’m learning that just my personal preference. I felt like it also didn’t really deliver on the mystery… Or at least it didn’t resonate with me as much. But I’m also not much into family history either. But anyway, I think it reads extremely well and was so lyrical. It also was really serious and genuine; I could feel how much the author loves Cuba by reading this book. I also think it brought up a lot of good discussion points and did a good job of taking into consideration all different viewpoints. I walked away from the book feeling like none of the characters, and even the diverse people of Cuba (different socio-economic, ethnicities, and genders) were all affected and had different opinions. And after considering the cover, I think I also appreciated the message and the main theme of the book a lot better.