• hmmm… So this character already has some paradigms I’m not a fan of. But with the writing style, I can’t be certain if it’s satire or not.
  • UM, I can ship her and Pizza guy.
  • Then again, he doesn’t seem like he’d be a good fit for her.
  • So the other characters in Elizabeth’s life are being translated into 18th-century English then?
  • Lol, chamber pots.
  • Oooh, it’s raining. Is she going to seek shelter in a building and Mr. Bingley and Dary will be there having dinner with the officers there? Or they’ll ride by on horseback?!
  • HUZZAH!
  • I like that we get to see some of Mr. Bingley’s thoughts, but it feels a bit inconsistent with the rest of the book because we’ve only had Elizabeth’s thoughts so far.
  • So my mind is trying to figure out what happens in the end. Like she has to go back to her time right? So… is a guy who just happens to look like fantasy Mr. Bingley going to appear when she wakes up?
    • In hindsight I’m like “duh” that’s obviously what’s going to happen, but when I was reading I was totally immersed and oblivious to it RIP me, lol
  • I think the denial is coming on a little strong. I mean as the reader we obviously know she’s going to end up with Mr. Bingley because “title”, but it’s coming on a little strong. Like, I’ve read books where the characters convince themselves of something and this just doesn’t seem like as strong as of an execution. It feels like she’s consciously making the decision to deny it for plot reasons instead of naturally?
  • “In my humble opinion, it would make for a more enjoyable story if the gentleman loved the lady right from the start.” But seriously Bingley has this all figured out.
  • I personally think using exact lines from the book and original dialogue is fine, but I think it’s a little overused.
  • Again, here’s another time exact lines from other versions are used. Though I think the author nailed Caroline. Her iconic condescending that’s entirely her brand and different from Lady Catherine’s.
  • Elizabeth is always talking about getting Mr. Dary and Mr. Bingley to fall for the “right” people, but shouldn’t she also be concerned with herself actually falling in love with Mr. Darcy, which she obviously isn’t (other than with his looks).
  • GOSH SHE’S SO OBLIVIOUS IT’S OBVIOUS MR. DARCY LIKES JANE
  • But this guy is not Bryan… he’s Mr. Wickham and any references she makes to their relationship is not going to make any sense.
  • Okay, the only explanation Mr. Bingley has for asking Jane for the first 2 dances, is that he wants to ask her about Elizabeth. Maybe he’s just seeking advice?
  • Okay, well maybe not. Even I’m doubting whether Mr. Bingley actually likes her now.
  • This water scene is pretty cringey tbh…
  • I’ve often thought of Mary on the ace-spectrum, and I love her for that.
  • “This parlor is for my own particular use” and “My wife encourages me to be outside as much as possible”. Lol, Charlotte is truly a genius.
  • Switching back and forth between modern language and 1800s talk is really getting exhausting, we need to pick one and stick with it.
  • The events of this book are way to scrambled. I wish we, as the reader, would have a better idea of what’s going on, even if Elizabeth doesn’t.
  • How is she getting drunk off some wine, what has she been consuming so far that she’s never been drunk??
  • LoOL, she thought Mr. Darcy was going to propose to her why is she so unaware?!?
  • The balance of this book is pretty good. I mean making sure all the motives are balanced—Elizabeth’s desire for her sisters happiness, and to follow the traditional story of Pride and Prejudice, and her own emotions—is pretty well done.
  • This book is so ambiguous about whether Jane knows that they’re in a story or not and there’s quite a few plot inconsistencies…
  • Again, the colloquial speaking style…
  • Didn’t Mrs. Gardiner already invite her??
  • Lol, why is Caroline among the Darcy family portraits??
  • Mr. Bingley is so cheerful, I can tell she really drew a lot of influence from the 2005 movie.
  • What the hell? So we’ve moved to using modern terms in dialogue now?? Georgiana Darcy doesn’t know what an ATM machine is lol
  • HAS SHE COMPLETELY LOST HER MIND PUNCHING GEORGIANNA???
  • Now the modern language moves to other characters too? Le sigh
  • Okay, so now the whole Dary/Jane thing is resolved and Wickham’s situation is tidied up. So they still have to go take care of Caroline.
  • Oh, so they’re having Darcy go right? That’s wise.
  • Lol, but wait. Why is Elizabeth going to talk to Caroline? I thought they were having a moment of clarity and Elizabeth and Jane were going to stay in the carriage and Mr. Darcy was going up but wtf, why is Elizabeth going? Caroline hates her and loves Darcy, why would she tell Elizabeth where Mr. Bingley is??
  • HOW IS CAROLINE SUPPOSED TO KNOW WHAT A JERK IS??
  • “this is a sacred place” I really can’t with that line
  • This end scene with Mr. Bingley is super cute.
  • Okay, but watching Mr. Darcy eat humble pie is one of the best scenes in the movie.
  • Alls well that ends well. And yes, the ending is quite predictable reflecting on it. It was sweet and romantic and lovely.
  • 4/10—I really wanted to love this. I liked it, but there are quite a few things that fell short. I think it probably would have benefitted from a few more read-throughs. Here are a few things I loved and a few things I wish had been different:
    • Privilege/historical accuracy:
      • There are quite a few incidents of this, where the plot doesn’t have real ramifications. For example, when Elizabeth punches Georgianna AND THEN Caroline Bingley—real regency men, no matter if they were Darcy and/or Bingley, would have been appalled by that, yet it’s never really addressed (Darcy essentially says “she had it coming” *eye roll* okay). In addition, Elizabeth makes the point to Mr. Wickham that Georgianna could expose him as a gay man to the world and he’d be “ruined” and says “it’s Darcy’s word against hers”, which yes. But I think that was a real opportunity to talk about some criticism of the Regency period, especially as Elizabeth is from the 20th century. So there’s just quite a few things that aren’t consistent and don’t really make sense for the time period. I get that yes Elizabeth is from the 20th century, but we need to pick sides. Go all Regency or all modern.
    • Execution of writing:
      • The author did an excellent job of capturing the style and voice of Jane Austen from the first page; the only other book I’ve read surround regency England that does this is Austenland (and I didn’t read all of it admittedly). So props to that, especially for the entire book. The only other book I’ve read that the voice and plot perfectly complimented each other is Beginner’s Guide: Love and Other Chemical Reactions.
    • Modern language:
      • I really can’t abide by this. Yes, I might be able to overlook Elizabeth using modern slang in her thoughts, but the writing clearly implied the author was going for a 1800s vibe, so that should have been kept consistent in my opinion.
    • Pride and Prejudice accuracy:
      • Despite not being about Elizabeth/Mr. Darcy Pride and Prejudice I really loved this book. It was a fantastic homage and so fun. All the major plot points of Pride and Prejudice were there and it was nice to see a different spin on the classic story.
    • I didn’t exactly have a strong connection/attachment to Elizabeth. I just didn’t relate or “care” about the character as much as I usually like to.