• That charming story totally set the tone for the whole book. I LOVED IT.
  • The most interesting part of the goblin men’s intentions is how they discredit her as a narrator.
  • Is it just me or am I reading LOTS of books with people getting married to either A) People who don’t want to get married or B) Getting married to people they don’t want to marry.
  • PEOPLE DON’T GET MARRIED UNLESS YOU WANT TO YEEEESH.
  • Oooh, yes. I love how seductive The Goblin King is.
    • Are we getting a name? Otherwise I’m abbreviating.
  • She’s supposed to figure out how to get to the Underworld but TGK pretty much does this for her?
  • I know we’re supoosed to ship Liesl and TGK but he’s creepy af. No, someone who loves you doesn’t kidnap your sister to get you to follow him.
  • I’m LIVING. She didn’t drink the wine and give up herself. There’s so many YA that go out of character just too loose control; it’s a cliche
  • Uugghh, never mind. Ignore earlier comment. Drunken stupor memories commence.
  • I know we’re supposed to have some sympathy for TGK, but even seeing him as a vulnerable youth has not shaken my heart yet.
  • So TGK not immortal, that’s nice, and less creepy.
  • The challenges have all been really vague and they have no consistency, which makes it hard for me to take them seriously.
  • Okay, now that I’m reading more of TGK and Liesl’s interactions, I’m more open to them as a couple but also still the nagging feeling that it’s wrong
  • TGK’s story is better than Constantze’s obviously.
  • I love how Liesl and Kathë have been so supportive of each other while trying to escape, like YES SISTET RELATIONSHIPS
  • After everything I can even believe they’re STILL underground!!
  • Stop, I am trash for childhood friends. Their childhood past is killing me.
  • This “last chance” is feeling A LOT like Phantom of the Opera. Major vibes, in regards to the movie AND the book.
  • TGK is a hopeless romantic.
  • WHO ELSE BUT YOU STOP.
  • 205
  • With the hands holding candelabras, don’t tell me you don’t think of Phantom of the Opera.
  • Ooooh, oh my gosh. Lol. Yes. Acknowledging the physical realities of sex.
  • Comstantze is obviously the brave maiden who escaped.
  • I still don’t really get the whole age thing and Goblin King succession especially after bringing in these other Goblin Queens.
  • I’m really confused about the time. TGK is acting like SO much time has passed between their first dinner and the wedding night but wasn’t it, like last night??
  • OK, I’m sorry but the rest of this was a whirlwind so I don’t really know what to write about it. Only that she had another challenge to get out of the Underground and the game thing they played was really cute (truth or forfeit) and she’s dying because of how much passion she has to give to TGK (and therefore the whole world) and so she decides to choose to live instead of stay Underground. TGK wants her to escape so he helps her?
  • If the current of the Underground Lake would have eventually pulled her to Aboveground why did she flipping get in the water? Why didn’t she find a boat??
  • 5/10—Again the last part of the book was a hurricane and really confusing and I didn’t understand it. Maybe I would like it more if I had seen/liked Labyrinth. The things I had issues with related to world building and are listed above. If anyone can explain any of these and prove me wrong let me know!! I also talked about my favorite part of the whole book below.
    • The whole magic system is REALLY confusing; we know there’s the “old laws” but no explanation is given as to the limits. Twig and Thistle tell Liesl “wish come at a cost” but we never see the repercussions of all the wishing she does, which is a considerable amount.
    • WHAT EXACTLY ARE “THE OLD LAWS”??
    • When she leaves the underworld as the Goblin Queen, she takes the boat and almost gets whatevered by the Lorelei, but when she leaves at the end of the book she just walks into the water; like why wouldn’t you just find a boat and row across the water? Why would you engage the Lorelei if you knew it would be hazardous and dangerous to your safety?
    • This is a challenge book, and I understand that. But it’s like Liesl didn’t even accomplish half of the tasks she was supposed to do; like when she was supposed to figure out how to get to the Underground, she fainted in the Goblin Groove and was taken underground by TGK. Like is her way to get Underground to follow the rules of the universe and then TGK is honor bound by the old laws to accept her sacrifice? Also, she was able to get Kathë
    • Before she was the Goblin Queen, she was able to simply wish things and make them happen, but then after it was like she was hollering into the void??
    • There’s a lot of sex as an answer to what needed to happen??
    • It seemed like they “became one” (not in the sexual way) a LOT of times. Like it was constantly back and forth between “I’ve given myself entire” but then the next time they talked TGK would be like, “hey you still kept something back.”
    • Also there’s a lot of talk of the “turning of the seasons” and as long as Liesl stays underground the seasons will pass? The idea is that when there’s a maiden Underground as TGK’s wife then the seasons will turn but we’ve never seen any lack of seasons before Liesl became the Goblin Queen? And then when Liesl returns Aboveground, what will happen to the world? (Also how much time has passed? It’s REALLY vague) Or if TGK will simply take another wife then why is it such a big deal that it has to be her??
  • Here’s what I loved most about this book and for me, this is the theme that resonated most with me after I finished the book. I LOVED Liesl’s character arc in this book. So few heroines are allowed to love themselves, and I know this book is sold as a Labyrinth retelling, but I’ve never seen Labyrinth because I’m a scardy cat. This book is fantasy and myth incarnate, but at its core, it’s a book about learning to love yourself and do what’s best for you and for that, I’ll love it until the end of forever. At the beginning of the book, Liesl is so focused on doing what’s best for her family, for the inn, for Joseph’s career and for Kathë’s security. And I also love how doubtful and hesitant she is to claim that happiness for herself because I honestly think so many of us are in the business of denying happiness to ourselves. At the end of the book, Liesl literally gives up the balance of the world because she knows she deserves to be happy and not trapped underground; She spits in the face of disgusting insults she already knows to be false. I want to see MUCH more of this in YA books; of heroines who learn to love themselves and knowing their choices aren’t the best for everyone, know those same choices will bring them happiness. And choose them.
  • Don’t think I hated this book, because I didn’t. I just had some issues with it. Other than the aforementioned, the writing was my favorite part of it. S. Jae-Jones has a way with words!
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